Which One For You: Living in the Big City, Suburbs, or Countryside?

Thursday, 28 July 2016


When writing this article, I'm admittedly hungry and craving for Ramen. It's been over a month since I've never eaten out with my girls again. We're totally busy with new boyfriends, summer vacation, working, and also another reason we never talk honestly. Longing for spending some money to dine out, makes me getting bored of something in the refrigerator. It always ends up with salmon (and salmon). Duh!

So what to do with Ramen? Yes, because Japanese restaurant does only exist in Copenhagen and I'm living about 11 km away. Sadly, I had to be forlorn just eating cereal tonight.

Although I can call the restaurant and ask for delivery, but the area where I live is too far away. The average food can be delivered is only pizza or sushi around here. All right, so this the fate living in the suburbs.

Sort of experiences of living in big cities, suburbs, and had also lived in the countryside for 7 months in Belgium, allow me to make a comparison of the ups and downs of living in these areas. Although every country and city can't be equated, but as a generalization, this is what the pluses and minuses that I've ever felt.

Hustling in big cities


Plus:
1. The ease and rapidity in receiving new information.
2. Public transportation operates longer and varied; for example Metro, night bus, tram, or late night train, only exist in the capital or other second or third biggest cities.
3. Lots of places to eat and hang out.
4. The atmosphere is more lively and colorful.
5. A lot of festivals and concerts are held only in big cities.

Minus:
1. Busy and let's name it: jam!
2. The behavior of the people belongs to the individualistic and aloof.
3. In Europe, it is very difficult to find housing in big cities. Most people live in apartments with limited space.
4. Security in large cities tends to be low.
5. The stress level is higher.

Feeling cozy in the suburbs


Plus:
1. Although Metro is not operating, but the schedule of bus and train to big cities are usually very regular and more frequent.
2. Many people choose to have a private large house complete with nice garden.
3. Life is quieter but not far enough to catch the hustle in a big city.
4. Lovely green parks that make the atmosphere more refreshing.
5. Not as rousing as in big cities, but cultural events and local concerts are also held often.

Minus:
1. Barrier places for hangout and dining.
2. Most public transportation only runs until midnight.
3. Crowded in the morning, but more deserted after 9 pm.
4. Although there are supermarkets and shops, but the opening hour is usually faster.
5. No additional exciting reason besides residence of people who mostly work in the capital and come back for relaxation.

Calming down in the countryside


Plus:
1. Nature lovers, this is your best place!
2. Away from the city center makes life in the countryside is very quiet and calming.
3. Normally neighbors know each other.
4. People living in countrysides are (so far) more welcoming and warm.
5. Security is higher. While living in Belgium, the house of my family in Laarne never been locked up for many years. But they never report for any serious robbed.

Minus:
1. Because the average person living in the countryside have private cars, buses and trains aren't operating optimally, not even until midnight.
2. Not much to see except forests, grasslands, and lakes.
3. It's so damn difficult to find a place to hang out for young people. In Europe, bars in countrysides are most often visited by old people only.
4. The night is very quiet, darkest (but so beautiful sky), and boring.
5. Lack of festival and concert, everybody has to come all the way out to the nearest bigger city.

If my own, I'd choose to live in the big city. I like to hang out, I like to calm the brain down in a bookstore or cafe, and also I'm quite familiar with the bustle of big city. Ease of access to public transportation and a more colorful life are some reasons why this is very suitable for young people like me. How about you?


No comments:

Care to leave your comments?